Selected Families and Individuals

Notes


Alexander Gerst

Records conflict on date of birth: Feb 1870 (1900 census) vs. Feb 1869 (Snider).

On 10 Jan 1895, the Caldwell Ohio newspaper reported:
Alex & August Gerst, Frank Ritterbeck and Herman Fox spent the holidays in Wheeling.

In 1900, 30 year old unmarried Alic Gerst worked in a saw mill and lived with his parents and several siblings in Enoch Twp., Noble County, Ohio.

Alexander and Matilda Huffman Gerst's Golden Wedding Anniversary announcement appeared in The Zanesville (OH) Signal newspaper on December 3, 1953: CALDWELL -- Mr. and Mrs. Alex Gerst of Fulda observed their
golden wedding anniversary, Wednesday, Nov. 18, at their home.
They were married November 18, 1903, at St. Mary's church,
Fulda, where they are still church members. They are the parents
of two children Elmer Gerst of the home, and Mrs. Herbert Noll,
of Zanesville, route 2. They have three grandchildren and one
great-grandchild. Mr. Gerst is 85 years of age and Mrs. Gerst
is 81.

Alex Gerst's obituary appeared in The Zanesville (OH) Signal newspaper on August 7, 1959. Alex Durst (sic: Gerst), 90, native of Fulda died at 7:15 o'clock
Thursday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Herbert Noll of Zanes-
ville Route 3. He had resided with his daughter for the past year. Mr. Durst was born in Fulda on Feb. 28, 1869. He was a retired
farmer and was a member of St. Mary's Catholic Church in Fulda. Surviving in addition to Mrs. Noll are one son, Elmer of Cambridge;
three grandchildren and on great - grandchild. The body was removed to the Estadt Funeral Home in Caldwell
where arrangements are incomplete.


Matilda Huffman

After five years of marriage, Matilda Huffman Arnold had not had any children, according to the 1900 census.

Birthday announcement from the Zanesville Times Recorder, 16 Jul 1925:
TRIPLE BIRTHDAY PARTY ENJOYED
On Sunday night, July 12, a large crowd gathered at the home of
F. A. Smith to celebrate triple birthdays in honor of Fred Fox, who has
reached the ripe old age of 88, Mrs. Alex Gerst and F. A. Smith both
being 52 years of age. A jolly time was had by all. Mrs. Smith served
a very delightful repast.
The following guests attended: Mr. and Mrs. Fred Fox, Ignatz Fox
and five children, Claude, Irene, Frederick, Marcella and Rita; Mrs.
S. C. Hohmann and son, Herman of Harrietsville, O.; Mr. and Mrs.
Alex Singer and daughter Winifred; Mr. and Mrs. Fred M. Singer, of
Cleveland, O.; Mr. and Mrs. Alex Gerst and son, Elmer; Mr. and Mrs.
John Weber; Ott Miller; Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Crum and two children,
Pauline and Bernard; Messrs. W. A. Ehlermann and T. M. Ehler-
mann of Sioux City, Iowa, and Caldwell, respectively, William
Arnold of Caldwell; Clarke Blackstone and five children, Agnes,
Bernard, George Albert, Wilbert and John; Terence Mickel; Ida
Schell and Olga Noll of Canton and Zanesville respectively.

The following article appeared in The Zanesville (OH) Signal on November 8, 1931: TILLIE'S LIKE OUT TO AUNT MARY'S FULDA IS BUILT ON HILL TOP AND SHE LIVES AT VERY TOP Quaint Settlement is Attractive Spot; One Street Town, No Room For More Fulda is built on top of a hill and the house on top of the hill on this hill is Tillie's. A small crowd bound for Fulda to have dinner with Tillie included the "Things to See on Your Trip" man from the Times-Signal. It was a great trip and it was a great dinner. Tillie gives you your choice now of fresh country chicken or real home cured ham with plenty of fried eggs. But we'll talk about the dinner later. Fulda is a one street town on the summit of one of Noble county's most majestic hills. There couldn't be two streets on top of the hill cause the hill top isn't wide enough for them. There is the Main street, houses on both sides and from there the slope begins, down, down, down. And, it is in these surroundings that the few Fulda residents live and farm and raise live stock and prosper. You wind around the side of a hill, in fact, two, perhaps three hills, after you leave Caldwell, on your way to Fulda. The last hill is a mountainous affair, steep grade, high cut, on the inside and steep precipice on the other. Reaching the top, there you are, in Fulda. Church Built Century Ago You are immediately impressed by the big brick church which stands at the entrance to the town. The stone above the main door reveals that this structure was built in 1825 -- more than one hundred years ago. It is still in excellent condition. It bears the name of the Church of the Immaculate Conception. It is well kept and the residents informed us that they have just completed a new heating system. It has a small pipe organ in the loft and we noticed an electric light suspended from there. The church follows gothic lines and attached to each pillar in the auditorium was an oil lamp. The three altars are of hard wood, possibly walnut in natural colors. Twilight was falling and respecting the privacy of the sanctuary, we strangers did not enter there to more closely inspect there rare old woods in the altars. The parsonage close by was made of the same brick material as the church and appears equally as old. Modernism is lent to the scene by a garage close at hand. In the rear of a ridge is the home of the sister-teachers and the school. These are the only buildings off the Main street. High Up in the Hills High up on the hills of Fulda, affords a magnificent view of rolling lands, steep hills, winding roads, fertile valley, hill side corn patches and deep woods with their varigated colorings these fal (sic) days. On the church is a marker showing the elevation at 1,173 feet above sea level so you can see that you are up some in Fulda. One of our party, who has been all over the state declared the view from Fulda the most entrancing in the state. and the trip is one of the most interesting and enjoyable he had had in months. And, its only about four or five miles out of the way from Caldwell. Then we sought out Tillie's home. "It's right over there, that big white house on top of the hill." one of the two store keepers in the town told us. Saw Piece in Paper "Say" he inquired "are you the fellow that put that piece in the paper about Tillie? I thought you were. Ever since that piece came out strangers have been driving up here inquiring for Tillie's place." he said. Well, we soon found Tillie's place. We introduced ourselves to the woman who answered our knock and whom we had decreed should be our hostess on this occasion. We apologized for calling her Tillie but explained that we didn't know any more of her name but that the fame of her country dinners had reached us and that we had come out to see and taste for ourselves. Meet Mrs. Tillie Gerst She explained that she is Mrs. Tillie Gerst that her husband is a farmer and stock raiser -- he also owns the cider mill -- and that she, for years, has been serving dinners to the traveling men and drummers who happen to be on the hill top as meal time and wanted something to eat. "Would we like chicken or country ham?" she inquired. We decided on chicken. "It will be ready in about an hour," she replied -- and it was. Meantime we spent a pleasant and profitable hour exploring Fulda. Incidentally we learned that this is a community of Germans, living way off here in the hills by themselves -- an energetic, prosperous community of farmers and stock raisers. Over the bank from Main street we saw the towns only recreational center -- the Fulda dance hall. Half gallon Cans Going back to the house we found dinner ready. Fried chicken and gravy and mashed potatoes and turnips cooked so they were good and kidney beans and some home made bread, great big white slices along with light rolls and butter fresh from the churn and the best quince honey ever tasted and then big pieces of berry pie -- guess that's enough to make your mouth water. And the best ground pickle sauce in the world and slaw and why, there must have been other things too 'cause a great big table was clear full. Then Tillie told us about her cellar. In winter times she 'puts away' a beef so the men will have fresh beef in summer as they are so far away from the market up there. They don't bother about chickens. there's always plenty of chickens and fresh eggs and smoked ham bacon and side and things like that. but vegetables why she cans them by the half gallon -- not quarts. She had 90 half gallons of this and a hundred gallons of this and a hundred half gallons of that. Her cellar must look like a community store house. The whole dinner was right off her own farm. then she went down into the cellar and brought out some of the finest and tastiest peaches you ever heard of. It was a real treat having dinner at Tillie's. Just like James Whitcomb riley talked about in his poem "Out to Ol Aunt Mary's" Joe Fisher's Place Right at the foot of Tillie's place is one of the most interesting establishments you'd find in may a day. It's Joe Fisher's shoe and harness shop. Joe is an interesting character. He added harness to his line when there wasn't enough shoe work to keep him busy any more. And, would you believe it, he still uses leather for shoe soles. Yessir, great big pieces of tanned hide there on the floor ready to cut up into shoe soles. "Darned automobiles nearly ruined my business." Joe commented. Yes sir, out in Fulda they have automobiles and there's little for Joe to do, repairing harness any more except for the heavy work horses. No fancy harness for the family buggy these days. Joe has a real old time harness shop. His little shop is filled with collars and straps and harness and benches where he repairs shoes and sews up broken harness. but the sight of a full side of leather on the floor. How long has it been since you saw such a sight in a shoe store? Well, you'll find it in Fulda. Has Own Gas Well There's another thing about Tillie's place. It is a typical home farm, nice front yard with shade and apple trees. That light on the porch burns all the time. They have their own gas well on the farm so they don't have to worry about heat and light bills. Tillie and Joe and the rest of the folks we met and the scenery and the "customs of the country" made the afternoon well worth while. And, of course, we saw the kiddies with their lunch baskets trudging home from school. A fine lot of youngsters -- they grow them fine and keep them healthy looking and smiling out at Fulda.


Elmer P. Gerst

Elmer Gerst was known as Jimmy. He never married. Jimmy lived and worked at home with his parents until failing health in later years.

Jimmy chewed tobacco and smoked a pipe. One time, Jimmy was shooting target practice with Herb Noll, his brother-in-law, with a 22 caliber rifle. Jimmy accidentally got a cartridge mixed with his tobacco and put it into his pipe. As the tobacco burned, the cartridge exploded. The pipe burst into pieces right in front of Jimmy's nose. Luckily, neither Jimmy nor Herb was injured.

Elmer "Jimmy" Gerst's obituary was published in the Zanesville Times Recorder on 09 Feb 1962:

Elmer Gerst, 52, of Fulda, Noble County, died at 11 a.m. Thursday
(Feb 9) at a Cambridge hospital after a long illness. A native of Noble
County, he was a son of Alex and Matilda Gerst. He was a farmer.
Surviving are a sister, Mrs. Herbert Noll of West pike, two nieces,
Mrs. Eleanor Teeters of Route 2 and Mrs. Mary Smith of Dryden Road
and a nephew, Richard Noll of West poke. The body is at the Estadt
Funeral Home at Caldwell.


Charles Gerst

In 1910, Charles (37) and Gertrude (33) Gerst owned a house at 220 Emerald St., Youngstown, Mahoning County, Ohio. The couple, who had been married for twelve years, had seven children, five of whom were living in 1910. The surviving children were Sophia (10), Andrew (7), Linus (4), Alma (2), and Carl (8 months). Sophia and Andrew attended school. Charles worked running the motor in a planing mill. The Gerst's next door neighbors were fellow Fulda native Nicholas Hartman, and his first cousin August Gerst. Several other Fulda natives lived on the street as well.

According to his death certificate, 38 year old Charles Gerst was an engineer.


Gertrude C. Nau

By the time of the 1910 census, Gertrude Nau Gerst had given birth to seven children, five of whom were still living.

In 1930, widow Gertrude C. Gerst (53) owned a home worth $8000 at 221 Breaden Street in Youngstown, Mahoning Co., Ohio with children Andrew J. (28), Linus (24), Alma M. (22), Carl W. (20), and Frank A. (18). Only Carl attended school. Gertrude was not employed, but all of the children were. The Gerst family owned a radio set.


Andrew J. Gerst

In 1930, Andrew Gerst lived with his widowed mother and younger siblings in the family home in Youngstown, Ohio. Andrew was employed as a bricklayer in the housing industry.

Andrew Gerst was married at the time of his death. His wife's name is not known.


Linus H. Gerst

In 1930, Linus Gerst lived with his widowed mother and siblings in the family home in Youngstown, Ohio. Linus was employed as a house carpenter. His Social Security number issued in Florida prior to 1951.


Alma Matilda Gerst

In 1930, Alma Gerst lived with her widowed mother and siblings in the family home in Youngstown, Ohio. Alma worked as a stenographer for a plumbing supply business.


Frank Aloysuis Gerst

Frank A. Gerst never married. In 1930, he lived with his widowed mother and older siblings in the family's home in Youngstown, Ohio. Frank was a printer for a steel furniture business.


Adam Henry Nau

In 1900, 27 year old farmer Adam Nau lived on a farm that he owned in Enoch Twp., Noble County, Ohio with his 25 year old wife, Mary and two children: Sylvinia (2) and Amilda (9 months). The census states that Adam and his mother were born in Ohio; his father was born in Germany. (Other records indicate that both parents were born in Germany.)

From the 21 Mar 2005 edition of the Caldwell Journal Leader
*100 YEARS [AGO]*
* * *
FULDA -- Adam Nau has now piped the gas from his wells to town
and the most of our people now use gas for fuel and lights.

In 1910 37 year old farmer Adam Nan (Nau) lived with his wife of 13 years Mary (35) on a farm they owned in Enoch Twp., Noble Co., Ohio. Living with them were their children Sylvina M. (12), Milda C. (10), William A. (8), Sophia E. (6), Men P. (4), Freda M. (2), and Joseph R. (8 mos). Also living with them were Adam's widowed mother Elizabeth (67) and his uncle, George Blake (65). The four older children attended school. All members of the household were born in Ohio as were Adam's mother and Mary's father. Adam's father was born in Germany, Mary's mother in W. Virginia. The adjacent farm was owned by Adam's aunt, Catherine Blake. Other neighbors included the Joseph Miller family and Philip and Rose Homan [Hohman].

On September 12, 1918, 45 year old self employed farmer, Adam Nau (dob September 29, 1972) of RFD #1, Caldwell, Noble Co., Ohio registered for the military draft. His nearest relative is given as Sofa Eva Nau of the same address. Adam's physical description is given as medium height and build, light blue eyes and light hair.

In 1920, 46 year old farmer Adam Nau lived with his wife Nany [Mary] (45) on a farm they owned in Enoch Twp., Noble Co., Ohio. Living with them were their children William (18), Sophia (16), Mare [Marie] (14), Freda (12), Joseph (10) and Celia (8). All of the children except William attended school. All members of the household were born in Ohio as were Adam's mother and Marie's parents. Adam's father was born in Germany. Adjacent farms on the census belonged to Nicolas Miller and Elizabeth Shafer.

In 1930, 57 year old farmer Adam Nau lived on a farm he owned (value $2000) in Enoch Twp., Noble Co., Ohio. Living with his were his son, Joe (20), and daughter, Cecilia (18). The census indicated that Adam was married, however his wife did not live with the family. Joe worked as a farm laborer. All members of the household were born in Ohio as was Adam's mother. Adam's father was born in Germany. Adjacent farms on the census belonged to Louis Kress and Nick Miller.


The following appeared in The Zanesville (OH) signal newspaper on Oct 1, 1932: BIRTHDAY SURPRISE Adam Nau, Cumberland street, was pleasantly surprised Wed-
esday evening when a group of friends gathered at his home to help
celebrate his 50th birthday anniversary. Three tables of progressive
euchre occupied the evening hours with Joseph Nau winning the
trophy fro high score. Miss Cecelia Nau won second prize. After the games oysters were served at one long table
centered with a large birthday cake decorated with lighted candles.
covers were laid for the following. Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Miller and
children Howard, Wilma, Virginia and Richard; Mr. and Mrs.
Jessie Merry and children, Dorothy, Ruth, Richard, Dale and
Cynthia Ann; Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Nau and son, James; Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Elchorn and daughter, Mildred; Mr. and Mrs.
Wade Gillespie; Mrs. Sophia Estadt and children, Laverne,
Madelyn and Mary.


Adazm Nau's obituary, from the Zanesville Times Recorder, pg 6, 27 Mar 1950:
ADAM H. NAU, 77, TAKEN BY DEATH
SUMMERFIELD, O. - Adam H. Nau, 77, died Saturday afternoon
at 3 o’clock at the Clark rest home, Caldwell. A Summerfield resident, he
had been ill for five years.
He was born in Noble county and spent his life in Fulda. Surviving
are his widow, Mary, six daughters, Mrs. Clarence Miller of Zanesville, Mrs.
Jessie Merry of Caldwell Rt., Mrs. Sophia Estadt of Zanesville, Mrs. Clyde
Schehl of Cumberland Rt., Sister M. Consolata of the Ursuline convent in Old
Washington, and Mrs. Cecelia Ostroski of Caldwell Rt.; two sons, William
Nau of Dexter City Rt., and Joseph Nau of Louisville, Stark county; and
three brothers, John of Dexter City, Frank of Caldwell and Roman of Canton.
The body has been taken to the home of the daughter, Mrs. Ostroski
near Fulda. Services will be held Tuesday morning at 9:30 o’clock [at] St. Mary's
Catholic church, Fulda.
Rev. Fr. B. J. Mattes will officiate, assisted by Fr. Pekalla and Fr.
Martin. Burial will be in the church cemetery, by the Brubach Funeral Home,
Summerfield.


Mary Magdalene Gerst

Sources conflict on date of birth:
Jan 1874 1900 census
10 Feb 1874 death certificate

In 1930, Mary Nau (55) was a patient at the Athens State Hospital for the Insane in Athens Twp., Athens Co., Ohio. Her place of birth is given as United States. She was married at the time of the 1930 census.

Mary's death certificate states that she had suffered from paranoid schizophrenia for 43 years. She may have suffered her first psychotic breakdown around 1908, when she was about 34 years old. She died at the Cambridge State Hospital.


Freda M. Nau

Freda entered the convent as Sister M. Consolate. In 1950, she was living in the Ursuline convent in Old Washington, Guernsey county, Ohio.


Anthony Snider

In 1900, Anthony Snider lived on the family farm with his father, step-mother and siblings in Stock Twp., Noble County. His occupation is listed as "farm laborer."

In 1920, Anthony Snider (43) lived in a home that he owned at 219 Breaden St., Youngstown, Mahoning Co., Ohio with his wife Eva (42) and daughter Colleta (5 yrs 6 months). Also living in the house was a 20 year old boarder, Mildred Nau. Mildred, daughter of Adam Nau and Marian Gerst, was Eva Gerst Snider's niece. Anthony was employed as a carpenter.

In 1930, carpenter Anthony Snider lived a home that he owned at 3123 Idlewood Ave. in Youngstown, with his wife Eva, daughter Colletta (15) and adopted daughter Ella Warner (5). Ella's birth parents are not known. Colletta attended school. The Snider home was valued at $8000. The family owned a radio set.


Henry John Gerst

The image for the enumeration district in which Henry Gerst's family lived in 1930 was unavailable when checked in Jan 2003. Family information has been extracted from the census index.

From death certificate:
Name: Henry John Gerst
Residence: 636 Parkwood Ave., Youngstown, Mahoning Co., Ohio
Age: 62 years 25 days
Occupation: Carpenter Contractor for 30 years; has not worked since Oct 1940
Birth: 09 Feb 1879, Fulda, Ohio
Marital status: Married
Spouse: Elizabeth Zwick Gerst
Father: John Gerst, Fulda Ohio
Mother: Marian Brahler, Fulda Ohio
Informant: Alfred Gerst, 635 Parkwood Ave.


Elizabeth Zwick

In 1900, 15 year old Lizzie Zwick lived on the farm of her older brother and sister-in-law Joseph and Maggie (Ruppel) Zwick in Enoch Twp., Noble County, Ohio.


Alfred J. Gerst

According to the online death certificate index, Alfred Gerst was married at the time of his death. His spouse's name is not known.


Robert H. Gerst

Robert Gerst never married.


Luella M. Gerst

Doris Gerst never married.


John L. Gerst

John L. Gerst never married.


Doris E. Gerst

Doris Gerst never married.


Leo Peter Gerst

In 1930, Peter Gerst (51) lived in a mortgaged home worth $5000 at 306 S. Hollywood Ave. in Youngstown, Mahoning County, Ohio. With him lived his wife Mary (48) and daughters Margaret (15), Leona (14), Mildred M. (12), and Virginia (2). The three oldest girls attended school. The family did not own a radio set. Peter was a carpenter, but he was unemployed at the time of the census. Living nearby on S. Schenley Ave. was the family of Emma Aldenhoven Scheetz (widow of Frank J. Scheetz)... they were cousins of the Gerst children. Both families were descended from John and Katherine (Heil) Gerst. Also living nearby was Peter's great-uncle August Gerst.

According to his death certificate, Peter Gerst fell while getting up out of a chair at his home and broke his right upper leg. He died several weeks later.


Mary Zwick

The following annoucement appeared in the "Fulda Locals" column of The Caldwell Citizens' Press on 25 Aug 1881:
Birth -- a daughter to Joseph and Margaret Zwick.

In 1900, 18 year old Mary Zwick lived on the farm of her older brother and sister-in-law, Joseph and Maggie (Ruppel) Zwick in Enoch Twp., Noble County, Ohio.


Edward Arnold

Records conflict on date of marriage:
28 Aug 1894 -- Snider, citing church records
14 May 1895 -- obituary of Edward Arnold
Researcher Roger Shockling points out that 28 Aug 1894 is the marriage date of Tillie's sister, Mary Huffman to Henry Dimmerling.

In 1900, 28 year old saloon keeper Edward Arnold lived on a rented farm in Enoch Twp., Noble County, Ohio with his 26 year old wife, Tillie. With them lived two year old Emily Dimmerling, identified as Edward's sister-in-law. Matilda Arnold's maiden name was Huffman, not Dimmerling, according to church records (Snider). Emily was born in West Virginia; her parents were born in Ohio. It is

Obituary:
Edward Arnold, son of Mrs. John ARNOLD, of Caldwell, died at his home at Fulda, Thursday afternoon, July 4th, 1901, after a lingering illness. The deceased was born at that place November 9, 1871, and was united in marriage to Miss Tillie Hurrman, May 14, 1895. The deceased came to Caldwell in 1890 with his parents, but later returned to Fulda, and while here made many lasting friends who very much regret his departure. The funeral services were held Saturday forenoon conducted by Rev. Father Pollman of the Fulda Roman Catholic church, after which the remains were laid to rest in the cemetery nearby. His survived by his wife, his mother and brothers, who have the deepest sympathy of all their friends.


Matilda Huffman

After five years of marriage, Matilda Huffman Arnold had not had any children, according to the 1900 census.

Birthday announcement from the Zanesville Times Recorder, 16 Jul 1925:
TRIPLE BIRTHDAY PARTY ENJOYED
On Sunday night, July 12, a large crowd gathered at the home of
F. A. Smith to celebrate triple birthdays in honor of Fred Fox, who has
reached the ripe old age of 88, Mrs. Alex Gerst and F. A. Smith both
being 52 years of age. A jolly time was had by all. Mrs. Smith served
a very delightful repast.
The following guests attended: Mr. and Mrs. Fred Fox, Ignatz Fox
and five children, Claude, Irene, Frederick, Marcella and Rita; Mrs.
S. C. Hohmann and son, Herman of Harrietsville, O.; Mr. and Mrs.
Alex Singer and daughter Winifred; Mr. and Mrs. Fred M. Singer, of
Cleveland, O.; Mr. and Mrs. Alex Gerst and son, Elmer; Mr. and Mrs.
John Weber; Ott Miller; Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Crum and two children,
Pauline and Bernard; Messrs. W. A. Ehlermann and T. M. Ehler-
mann of Sioux City, Iowa, and Caldwell, respectively, William
Arnold of Caldwell; Clarke Blackstone and five children, Agnes,
Bernard, George Albert, Wilbert and John; Terence Mickel; Ida
Schell and Olga Noll of Canton and Zanesville respectively.

The following article appeared in The Zanesville (OH) Signal on November 8, 1931: TILLIE'S LIKE OUT TO AUNT MARY'S FULDA IS BUILT ON HILL TOP AND SHE LIVES AT VERY TOP Quaint Settlement is Attractive Spot; One Street Town, No Room For More Fulda is built on top of a hill and the house on top of the hill on this hill is Tillie's. A small crowd bound for Fulda to have dinner with Tillie included the "Things to See on Your Trip" man from the Times-Signal. It was a great trip and it was a great dinner. Tillie gives you your choice now of fresh country chicken or real home cured ham with plenty of fried eggs. But we'll talk about the dinner later. Fulda is a one street town on the summit of one of Noble county's most majestic hills. There couldn't be two streets on top of the hill cause the hill top isn't wide enough for them. There is the Main street, houses on both sides and from there the slope begins, down, down, down. And, it is in these surroundings that the few Fulda residents live and farm and raise live stock and prosper. You wind around the side of a hill, in fact, two, perhaps three hills, after you leave Caldwell, on your way to Fulda. The last hill is a mountainous affair, steep grade, high cut, on the inside and steep precipice on the other. Reaching the top, there you are, in Fulda. Church Built Century Ago You are immediately impressed by the big brick church which stands at the entrance to the town. The stone above the main door reveals that this structure was built in 1825 -- more than one hundred years ago. It is still in excellent condition. It bears the name of the Church of the Immaculate Conception. It is well kept and the residents informed us that they have just completed a new heating system. It has a small pipe organ in the loft and we noticed an electric light suspended from there. The church follows gothic lines and attached to each pillar in the auditorium was an oil lamp. The three altars are of hard wood, possibly walnut in natural colors. Twilight was falling and respecting the privacy of the sanctuary, we strangers did not enter there to more closely inspect there rare old woods in the altars. The parsonage close by was made of the same brick material as the church and appears equally as old. Modernism is lent to the scene by a garage close at hand. In the rear of a ridge is the home of the sister-teachers and the school. These are the only buildings off the Main street. High Up in the Hills High up on the hills of Fulda, affords a magnificent view of rolling lands, steep hills, winding roads, fertile valley, hill side corn patches and deep woods with their varigated colorings these fal (sic) days. On the church is a marker showing the elevation at 1,173 feet above sea level so you can see that you are up some in Fulda. One of our party, who has been all over the state declared the view from Fulda the most entrancing in the state. and the trip is one of the most interesting and enjoyable he had had in months. And, its only about four or five miles out of the way from Caldwell. Then we sought out Tillie's home. "It's right over there, that big white house on top of the hill." one of the two store keepers in the town told us. Saw Piece in Paper "Say" he inquired "are you the fellow that put that piece in the paper about Tillie? I thought you were. Ever since that piece came out strangers have been driving up here inquiring for Tillie's place." he said. Well, we soon found Tillie's place. We introduced ourselves to the woman who answered our knock and whom we had decreed should be our hostess on this occasion. We apologized for calling her Tillie but explained that we didn't know any more of her name but that the fame of her country dinners had reached us and that we had come out to see and taste for ourselves. Meet Mrs. Tillie Gerst She explained that she is Mrs. Tillie Gerst that her husband is a farmer and stock raiser -- he also owns the cider mill -- and that she, for years, has been serving dinners to the traveling men and drummers who happen to be on the hill top as meal time and wanted something to eat. "Would we like chicken or country ham?" she inquired. We decided on chicken. "It will be ready in about an hour," she replied -- and it was. Meantime we spent a pleasant and profitable hour exploring Fulda. Incidentally we learned that this is a community of Germans, living way off here in the hills by themselves -- an energetic, prosperous community of farmers and stock raisers. Over the bank from Main street we saw the towns only recreational center -- the Fulda dance hall. Half gallon Cans Going back to the house we found dinner ready. Fried chicken and gravy and mashed potatoes and turnips cooked so they were good and kidney beans and some home made bread, great big white slices along with light rolls and butter fresh from the churn and the best quince honey ever tasted and then big pieces of berry pie -- guess that's enough to make your mouth water. And the best ground pickle sauce in the world and slaw and why, there must have been other things too 'cause a great big table was clear full. Then Tillie told us about her cellar. In winter times she 'puts away' a beef so the men will have fresh beef in summer as they are so far away from the market up there. They don't bother about chickens. there's always plenty of chickens and fresh eggs and smoked ham bacon and side and things like that. but vegetables why she cans them by the half gallon -- not quarts. She had 90 half gallons of this and a hundred gallons of this and a hundred half gallons of that. Her cellar must look like a community store house. The whole dinner was right off her own farm. then she went down into the cellar and brought out some of the finest and tastiest peaches you ever heard of. It was a real treat having dinner at Tillie's. Just like James Whitcomb riley talked about in his poem "Out to Ol Aunt Mary's" Joe Fisher's Place Right at the foot of Tillie's place is one of the most interesting establishments you'd find in may a day. It's Joe Fisher's shoe and harness shop. Joe is an interesting character. He added harness to his line when there wasn't enough shoe work to keep him busy any more. And, would you believe it, he still uses leather for shoe soles. Yessir, great big pieces of tanned hide there on the floor ready to cut up into shoe soles. "Darned automobiles nearly ruined my business." Joe commented. Yes sir, out in Fulda they have automobiles and there's little for Joe to do, repairing harness any more except for the heavy work horses. No fancy harness for the family buggy these days. Joe has a real old time harness shop. His little shop is filled with collars and straps and harness and benches where he repairs shoes and sews up broken harness. but the sight of a full side of leather on the floor. How long has it been since you saw such a sight in a shoe store? Well, you'll find it in Fulda. Has Own Gas Well There's another thing about Tillie's place. It is a typical home farm, nice front yard with shade and apple trees. That light on the porch burns all the time. They have their own gas well on the farm so they don't have to worry about heat and light bills. Tillie and Joe and the rest of the folks we met and the scenery and the "customs of the country" made the afternoon well worth while. And, of course, we saw the kiddies with their lunch baskets trudging home from school. A fine lot of youngsters -- they grow them fine and keep them healthy looking and smiling out at Fulda.


Henry Nau

Data published by Dale Schott indicate that Heinrich Nau sailed from Bremen on the "President Smidt" and arrived in Baltimore on 25 Oct 1856. (He would ave been 19 years old at that time.) He went to Wheeling, married, had a child, and then moved to the Fulda, Ohio area. This conflicts with census records, which state that all of Henry Nau's children were born in Ohio.

Three men named Nau settled in the Fulda area: Henry, Joseph, and Paul. Although they are often referred to as brothers, there is no evidence to confirm this.

In 1870, 32 year old "Henry Now" lived in Enoch Twp., Noble County, Ohio with his wife Elizabeth (28) and children Joanna (9), Francis (7), Mary (5), Barbara (3) and Anna B. (7 months). Adjacent farms in the census belonged to the Parks and Armstrong families.

At the time of the 1880 cenus, "Henry Nau" (42) still lived in Enoch Twp. with his wife Elizabeth (38) and nine children: Johanna (19), Frank (17), Mary (15), Barbara (14), Anna (11), Adam (8), Catherine (3), Gertrude (3), and Rosa (1). All the children attended school except Gertrude and Rosa. According to the census, Henry was born in Hesse, and everyone else in the household was born in Ohio. Neighboring farms in the census were those of J. Shriver and Jasper Harper. Henry's father-in-law, Michael Blake and his family lived three doors away.

In 1900, 62 year old farmer Henry Nau lived on a farm that he owned in Enoch Twp., Noble County, Ohio with his 58 year old wife, Elizabeth and their three youngest surviving children: Rosa (20), John (18), and Roman (12). Henry could read and speak English, but could not write.


Elizabeth Blake

In 1860, Elizabeth did not live with her parents and siblings at the time of the census (June).

According to the census, eleven of Elizabeth's 12 children were still living in 1900. This conflicts with church records, which show that Elizabeth had 13 children, at least two of whom died young: John died before 1880 and Amelda died at age 18 months in 1886.

Elizabeth was born in Ohio to German-born parents. She spoke English, but could not read or write.

Elizabeth Blake Nau's obituary appeared in The Caldwell Press on 29 Sep 1915:
Elizabeth Nau, daughter of Michael and Gertrude Blake was born in Ohio
May 24, 1842, and passed to her immortal crowning from her home with her
daughter, Mary [Miller] in Fulda, O., September 13, 1915. In 1860 she was
united in marriage to Henry Nau and for 47 years she was the strength and joy
of his life and the light of his home.
In early life she gave herself to Jesus Christ and united with the Catholic
church at Fulda, O., of which she was a faithful and consistent member until her
death. Her home life was an ideal picture of her love, kindness, patience, and
devotion to husband and children, there was no sacrifice too great for her to make
in the interest of her family. She gave the full measure of her strength and time
to the direction of her family in the way of usefulness and uprightness.
To this union 12 children were born, 11 of whom are living, Hannah, Frank,
Mary, Barby, Anna, Adam, Kathrin, Gertrude, Rosa, John, Roman, all of whom
survive her. Besides her children, she leaves to morn her death 1 sister, 2 brothers,
68 grandchildren, 2 great-grandchildren and a host of friends.
The funeral services conducted by Rev. Father Oeink was held at the Catholic
church Fulda, O., at 9 o’clock followed by interment in the Fulda cemetery.

Surname on death certiicate mis-indexed as "Nan." Cause of death was listed as "mentally derranged, refused to take nourishment. No physician in attendance." Death certificate informant was her daughter, Mary Miller of Caldwell.


Johanna Nau

In 1880, 19 year old Johanna Nau lived and worked on her parents' farm in Enoch Twp. She attended school that year. Johanna entered the Franciscan Sisters of the Sick Poor as Sister M. Gertrude. Johanna's father's will, written in 1905, mentions Johanna as one of his heirs.

An articke in the Caldwell Citzens' Press on 14 Oct 1880 stated:
Miss Hannah daughter of Henry Now, a very accomplished young lady, left home last
week to join the Sisters of Mercy at Cincinnati, and devote her life in the future to the sick
and poor.

Records conflict on place of birth:
Wheeling, VA Dale Schott
Ohio 1880 cenus


John Nau

Date of death is not proven, however, Henry and Elizabeth Nau had a second son named John in 1881. Also, John does not appear in the 1870 census.


Francis Joseph Zwick

1870, 26 year old Bavarian-born farmer Joseph Swick lived in Franklin Twp., Monroe County, Ohio with his wife Margaret (22) and son John (1). His household was located next to that of his brother Morris (Marx) in the census. There is no property value listed for Joseph, which suggests that he did not own any land. His personal possessions were worth $256.

Ten years later, F. J. Swick (38) lived in Enoch Twp., Noble County, Ohio with his wife Margaret (34) and children John (11), Joseph (8), Leonard (6), and Henry Michael (3). Adjacent households in the census belonged to his father-in-law Leonard Schoeppner and Joseph Miller Sr.

On 5 Jul 1883, the Caldwell Citizens' Press contained two brief notes about Francis Zwick:
            F. I. Zwick lost a valuable cow Thursday.

            John Zwick, brother of F. I. Zwick, of Monroe county, visited here on Sunday.

From the Fulda column of The Caldwell Citizens' Press 29 May 1884:
Cain Bros. are putting a new tin roof on the residence of F. I Zwick.


Margaret Schoeppner

The 1850 census states that Margaret Shopner was born in Ohio.


Anna C. Zwick

In 1900, 12 year old Anna Zwick lived on the farm of her older brother and his wife, Joseph and Maggie (Rupple) Zwick.


Michael Zwick

Sources conflict on date of birth:
14 Jun 1811 -- Snider, citing church records in Fulda, Ohio
19 Aug 1811 -- IGI

Michael Zwick came to US on board the ship "Charles Crocker" from Havre - arrived New York May 31, 1852. Michael, Katherine, 9 Children.. The trip across the Atlantic took 39 days. The Zwicks settled in Ohio: Franklin Twp. in Monroe Co, and Elk Twp. in Noble Co. Info from " German to America " by Filby & Glazies.

Some researchers list two additional children for Michael Zwick, however I believe that Morris and Marx are the same person, as are Mary and Margaret. [Lynn Coburger]

In 1860, Michael Swick (58) and his wife Catherine (45) owned a farm worth $2800 in Franklin Township, Monroe County, Ohio. The census-taker deviated from normal practice by not listing children in the household in chronological order; he wrote down the girls first, followed by the boys: Barbary (15), Mary (10), Catherine (6), Martin (22), Morris (19), George (17) , Joseph (15), John (12), and Peter (7). Only Joseph attended school. Everyone in the home was born in Bavaria except the two youngest children: Peter and Catherine, who were born in Ohio. The family's personal possessions were worth $800.

In 1870, 59 year old farmer Michael Swick lived in Franklin Twp., Monroe County, Ohio with his wife Catherine (55) and children John (23), Mary (19), and Peter (11). Everyone was born in Bavaria except Peter, who was born in Ohio. Peter attended school. Michael's farm was valued at $6500, and his possessions were worth $788. His son Martin lived next door in the census. Michael's other sons (George, Morris, Joseph) were enumerated on the same page.

Michael and Catherine Zwick lived by themselves at the time of the 1880 census. Several of their sons lived nearby.

A brief obituary appeared on 20 Mar 1884 in The Caldwell Citizens' Press from neighboring Noble County:
Death -- March 8th, at his residence in Franklin township, Monroe County,
Michael Zwick, father of F. J. Zwick of Enoch township, this county, aged
73 years.


Catharine Zwick

According to her death records, Catharine Zwick was born in 1851 but 16 years of age when she died. This means she was born about 1851 not 1853. The 1853 birthdate corresponds with a birthplace of OH. (Since her family came to America in 1852, she would have been born in Germany if her birthdate was 1851.)